Kargador at Dawn

Kargador at Dawn
Work in the Vineyard

Sunday, February 11, 2018

1st Sunday in Lent (B)

Short Reflection for the 1st Sunday of Lent (B)

Readings: Genesis 9: 8-15; 1 Peter 3: 18-22; Mark 1: 12-15

Selected Passage: “This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel." (Mk.1: 15)

Meditation: Lent is a special season that invites the faithful to be more attentive to the “disclosure” of the kingdom of God as they journey through life.  The Lenten call is to REPENT and BELIEVE in the Gospel. 

In a special way, we observe the season of Lent by Prayers, Discipline and Good Works, especially to the poor.  The Lenten Alay Kapwa Program is a reminder to all of the OBLIGATION to help the poor and the needy. Cf. www.badaliyya.blogspot.com

DHIKR SIMPLE METHOD...
Dhikr is an Arabic word for remembrance. In the “tariqa” (the way) movement, dhikr developed into a form of prayer… It is a prayer of the heart… following three simple steps:

1.    Write in one’s heart a certain passage of the Holy Writ…
2.   Make the same passage ever present in one’s lips. 
3.   Then wait for God’s disclosure on the meaning of the passage…that interprets one’s life NOW…!

It takes a week of remembering (dhikr)…or even more days to relish the beauty of this method…



Tuesday, February 06, 2018

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Short Reflection for the 6th Sunday in the Ordinary Time (B)
Readings: Leviticus 13: 1-2. 44-46; 1 Corinthians 10:31- 11:1; Mark 1: 40-45
Gospel Passage: “Moved with pity, Jesus stretched out his hand, touched the leper, and said to him, ‘I do will it. Be made clean’." (Mk.1: 41)
Reflection: We, too, need to feel Jesus’ “touch” and hear his voice “I do will it…” In one sense, all of us are suffering from the leprosy of sin. But that disease is not our truest self, our deepest nature. Our true nature is inherently beautiful, made in the divine image and likeness. This is what Jesus restores by his healing words and touch. www.badaliyya.blogspot.com
DHIKR SIMPLE METHOD...
Dhikr is an Arabic word for remembrance. In the “tariqa” (the way) movement, dhikr developed into a form of prayer… It is a prayer of the heart… following three simple steps:
1. Write in one’s heart a certain passage of the Holy Writ…
2. Make the same passage ever present in one’s lips.
3. Then wait for God’s disclosure on the meaning of the passage…that interprets one’s life NOW…!
It takes a week of remembering (dhikr)…or even more days to relish the beauty of this method…

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Charles de Foucauld - part 5


Charles de Foucauld - part 5
 In a Trice

For three full years after leaving Morocco, Charles was wholly taken up with the work of his sizeable book – A journey through Morocco.

On May 23, 1884, He left Morocco. “Islam has had profound effect on me… Acquaintance with this faith… has allowed me to sense something much bigger and more true than this worldly preoccupation… I began to study Islam”.

Two years later, in February 1886, he settled in Paris. In the same month, he had his first meeting in Paris with the well-known priest Huvelin. His church was only a few steps away from Charles flat.

Towards the end of the same year: “I began to go to Church but without believing, for it was only there that I felt right and spent hours saying the same prayer: ‘may Go, if you exist, let me recognize you’.

On 28 or 29 October 1886, he said to his cousin: “you are happy to believe; I am looking for the light and I cannot find it”.

On the very next day, he went to see Fr. Huvelin in the Church of St. Augustine. “I as ked for religious instruction. He made me kneel and make my confession and sent me to take communion at once”.

Imagine a pair of dancers moving gracefully over the dance floor. One of the partners is dancing quite different steps and is supported by an invisible partner.  Until in a trice his dancing partner had taken the initiative.

‘As soon as I believed that there was a God, I understood that I could not do anything other than live for him.  My religious vocation dates from the same moment as my faith. God is so great’

‘At first, faith had many obstacles to overcome .I had doubted so very much that I did not believe everything all at once…

The countenance of the mysterious Partner in the dance remains invisible to us.  All that we can sense of Him is that strong hand which had started to guide Charles on the right way.  For him, the dance had only just begun.

(Jun Mercado, OMI – Badaliyya Philippines)


Prayer as Sanity and Balance

PRAYER AS SANITY AND BALANCE

Genuine prayer, in effect, fills us with divine energy and tells us at the same time that this energy isn’t our own; that it works through us, but that it’s not us. To be healthy, we need both: If we lose connection to divine energy we drain of energy, depress, and feel empty. Conversely if we let divine energy flow into us but identify with it, somehow thinking that it is our own, we become grandiose, inflate with self-importance and arrogance, and become selfish and destructive.

Deep prayer is what energizes us and grounds us, both at the same time. We see this, for example, in a person like Mother Teresa, who was bursting with creative energy but was always very clear that this energy did not come from her, but from God, and she was merely a humble human instrument.

Lack of real prayer makes for two kinds of antithesis to Mother Teresa: On the one hand, it makes for a wonderfully talented and energetic man or woman who is full of creative energy, but is also full of grandiosity and ego; or, on the other hand, it makes for a man or woman who feels empty and flat and cannot radiate any positive energy.

Without prayer we will forever be bouncing back and forth between grandiosity and depression. Without prayer we will always be either too empty of energy or too full of ourselves.

To read more click here or copy this address into your browser http://ronrolheiser.com/prayer-as-sanity-and-balance/#.WlTOPEtG1E4
www.facebook.com/ronrolheiser



5th Sunday in Ordinary Time (B)

Short Reflection for the 5th Sunday of the Ordinary Time (B)

Readings: Job 7: 1-4. 6-7; 1 Corinthians 9: 16-19; Mark 1: 29-39

Selected Passages: “He cured many who were sick with various diseases, and he drove out many demons, not permitting them to speak because they knew him. Rising very early before dawn, he left and went off to a deserted place, where he prayed.”  (Mk.1: 34-35)

Meditation: After a day’s labor – healing the sick and casting out demons, Jesus went into a deserted place to rest and pray. We, too, have become “busy bodies”. We are caught up in our routine work and daily chores.  We need to find an appropriate time and place where we can rest and pray.  We need SILENCE to take stock of life and listen to God.    Cf. www.badaliyya.blogspot.com

DHIKR SIMPLE METHOD...
Dhikr is an Arabic word for remembrance. In the “tariqa” (the way) movement, dhikr developed into a form of prayer… It is a prayer of the heart… following three simple steps:

1.    Write in one’s heart a certain passage of the Holy Writ…
2.   Make the same passage ever present in one’s lips. 
3.   Then wait for God’s disclosure on the meaning of the passage…that interprets one’s life NOW…!

It takes a week of remembering (dhikr)…or even more days to relish the beauty of this method…


Saturday, January 27, 2018

Charles de Foucauld - part 4


Charles de Foucauld - part 4
“I Won Through…”

“The rebels were squashed. But they had made Charles curious and awakened in this loner an irresistible desire to get to know other people, to know the unknown.

Charles learned Arabic and read the Qur’an. He asked the army for an opportunity to study the subject nation. The army refused. Thus surrendered again his commission and left the army.

He decided on a long trip of exploration through Morocco. The French Geographical Society sent him to map the desert.
 
The risk was considerable, suicidal.  Two Europeans traveled through Morocco at the same time and disappeared.  His family tried to dissuade him. In vain!  From Morocco, Charles wrote later to his sister: ‘if one leaves saying that one is going to do something, one must not return without having done it’.

Charles described his journey: ‘I always had a notebook five centimeters square hidden in my left hand.  Used a stub of pencil, which never left out on my other hand, to write down what I saw on either side… In that way I was almost always writing as I went along… I was careful enough to walk in front of ir behind my companions, so that with the aid of my capacious garments they would not notice the slight movements of my hands’.

Charles discovered the sacred law of hospitality among Muslims as well as Jews.  It was something entirely new to him.  He loved it.  Up to then Muslims had been the ‘enemy’.  Now he met them as friends.

Now and then some hosts sensed who he really was.  They made smiling allusions and offered him gifts most civilly.  One of them even risked his life for Charles. ‘From then on my relationship with him was that of a friend. I exchanged trust for trust… I told him clearly who I was…  his friendship was all the more secure’.

The danger was very great on three occasions.  And each time, a Muslim risked everything to save Charles.  The third time, he almost lost his life.

Charles told a friend: ‘it was tough but interesting and I won through’.

Charles de Foucauld had emerged from his shell – a friend of Muslims and Jews.”


(Jun Mercado, OMI 1/26/18)

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Charles de Foucauld - part 3




Charles de Foucauld 003

“Meeting at the Well”.

“A meeting with Musa had been arranged at the Well of In Ouzzei on 25 June 1905.  Since the meeting last year at In Salah, Musa had not been again and questions were being asked.

Everything went well, Musa with his Touareg elders met with the French Officer as they sat in a circle  and discussed practical matters.

It was not long before two men were studying one another attentively.  One was Musa, son of Amastane. He was staring at a short man hardly 5’ and 5”, wearing nothing impressive, and slightly bowed. His tanned face was framed in a poorly trimmed beard.  What struck one immediately was his eyes – both penetrating and gentle. A broad mouth with many missing teeth produced a heartfelt smile as warm as the sun at In Ouzzel.

On his almost baldhead he wore a kind of woolen hat fitted with a nape-guard against the sun. is white tunic was torn and too short, and held together awkwardly at the waist with a leather belt.  It was like the tunics of the northern nomads. A long pair of rosary beads of heavy back wood hung from his nbelt. A red heart with a cross on it was sewn on his chest.  He wore Saharan sandals that he had made himself.

The Captain performed the introductions: “Charles de Foucauld, servant of the one god. He loves solitude and wishes to learn the language of the Kel Ahaggar”.
Would have done, the French marabout had decided to remain withdrawn.  Far from be
Musa knew that already. News travels fast in the Sahara.  Almost involuntarily, Musa compared his ‘own’ marabout, Ba-i, with this marabout of the French. He was impressive by the latter’s simplicity. 

De Foucauld sat cross-legged beside the Captain, who was seated on a folding stool.  Far from trying to direct the conversation, as Ba-i would have done, the French marabout had decided to remain withdrawn. Far from keeping his distance and hiding his true feelings behind a mysterious expression, however, the French marabout gave all possible signs of friendliness.  Musa was surprised to discover that he already spoke the language of the Touareg.

De Foucauld immediately recorded in his notebook: “Musa is a good and pious Muslim, with the ideas and way of life, qualities and disadvantages of a Muslim who acts in strict accordance with his faith but at the same time keeps as open a mind as possible”.

Musa, on his part, must certainly have wondered what a marabout was doing among soldiers.

And the French marabout asked the same question: ‘will they be able to tell soldiers from priests and see us as God’s servants…? I don’t know’.
The French captain said: “the French marabout would like to settle in the Hoggar”.

Musa knew how suspicious his people were. But how could he refuse  a request from the French?  They were stronger.  Moreover, they seemed to trust him.  But what if something happened to this marabout?

Charles de Foucauld noted down: “Musa’s agreement and undertaking to ensure the marabout’s safety was certainly not based on whim.  He thought the matter out carefully” and decided himself the exact spot where de Foucauld’s dwelling was to be built.

This man with a heart sewn on is breast is the man we are looking for – Charles de Foucauld!


(Note: At the time, the red heart with a cross was a sign of renewal in the Catholic Church, of a desire to restore a heart to a Church suffering from institutionalization.)